About your Search

20121201
20121231
SHOW
Book TV 47
Q & A 6
( more )
STATION
CSPAN2 70
CSPAN 51
MSNBCW 34
CNNW 16
SFGTV 13
SFGTV2 12
WMAR (ABC) 9
FBC 8
KQEH (PBS) 7
WUSA (CBS) 6
CNBC 4
KDTV (Univision) 3
KGO (ABC) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 308
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 314 (some duplicates have been removed)
capitalism and democracy in the nation was franklin roosevelt so in 1932 she signed on to the franklin roosevelt and was only one of the bankers to do so she was one of the only catholics to and he was one of the only hollywood men with hollywood connections he was solidly republican and loved herbert hoover. the all cider was on his way to becoming an insider and yet he refused to play by the rules to become part of the roosevelt team. he refused to to our madrassa at lycee what a4a you and your brain trust want to do i will back it, i am with you. yet he was so important to roosevelt as a banker and as an irish catholic and as an incredibly smart man that roosevelt appointed him the first chairman of the securities and exchange commission at a time roosevelt's colleagues and the new deal was, you know, why are you putting a fox in control of the chickens. and joseph kennedy was the greatest chairman of the sec that we have ever seen. he knew every trick of the trade, and he passed so many regulations and so many tough regulations that when he was finished, she had to get out of the m
was convinced that the only man who could write a ship, who could save was franklin roosevelt. so in 1932, he signed on to the franklin roosevelt seemed it was one of the only bankers to do so and was one of the only irish catholics to take a prominent position and was one of the only hollywood men with hollywood connections. hollywood then was solidly, solidly republican, who loved herbert hoover of california. the outsider was becoming an insider and yet he refused to play by the rules. he refused to become part of the roosevelt team. he refused to unabashedly say whatever you in your brain trust what to do, call back and i must say. and yet he was so important to roosevelt as a banker and it's an irish catholic and an incredibly smart man that roosevelt appointed him the first chairman of the securities and exchange commission at the time roosevelts colleagues and new dealers were horrified. why are you putting a fox in control of the chickens. and joseph kennedy was the greatest chairman of the fcc we've ever seen. he knew every trick of the trade and he passed so many regulations, such t
to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then in the 30s the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler. that led to anti-fascist forces globally in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise matÉriel and they had a hard time delivering that for a number of reasons and for a couple of years. stalin said if you give them airplanes and other equipment we need to stay in the war, the united states tries under the effort of other people who are not quite assistance air in providing that so the second man was they wanted the same territorial concessions they have gotten from hitler in 1939 pact that their main dem
. 1933 we have a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and her hoover. the two of them did not along so well. there was not a lot of conversation during their right to the capital. in many pictures that were taken at stake, roosevelt can be seen waving to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning toward hoover and trying to have a conversation, but in every picture you'll ever see hoover is looking straight ahead ignoring him. there have been other times for the president bill did not get along so well. that chapter is called can't we all belong. sometimes it whether it -- weather is a big issue. there in the carriage. and here is the route that they take, pennsylvania avenue heading toward the capital. now, from 1829 all the way through 1967, which covers the great majority of american inauguration's, they took place on the east side of the capitol, that east side. if you have been to washington you know that is where the side with the library of congress's and the united states supreme court. so here is what that looks like today on any given day. that is the east side of the c
, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were concerned that the soviets were going to capitulate. so the united states offers several things and the soviets make several demands and the united states proms material, and the united states has trouble delivering that for the first couple of years. stalin says if you give us airplanes and the other equipment we need, we can stay in the war. the united states tries, and other people are not as sincere in providing that. the second command is they wanted the -- their main demand 0 was for the second front. they were fighting -- the history, the americans and the british thought most of the world were fighting tenaces si divisions combined
the conference organizers for inviting me here today. in july of 1938 the roosevelt administration organize a national conference on health care reform. the great depression had been going on for nearly a decade. fdr had signed the social security act and fair labor standards act into law but the united states still had no national program for addressing the health needs of the people. the 1938 health conference was the beginning of something different. instead of inviting only doctors to speak, the conference for the first time included members of labor unions, farm groups and civil rights organizations. included representative not just of the medical profession but of the people who need it and use health care. a woman named florence greenberg traveled from chicago, illinois to washington to offer her testimony. she was a member of the women's auxiliary of the steelworkers organizing committee, spending her days working in communities around the steel mills. greenberg told the audience at the national health conference that she had come to offer them a different picture of chicago. just s
1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30's the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler and they were leading the antifascist force globally coming and the calculus party was instrumental and they had to have a movement in the united states from that. but during the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer several things and the soviets make several demands and promised the material and have a hard time delivering that in the first couple years but stalin says if you give the airplanes and the other equipment we need we can stay in a war. so that is the sincere effort other people are not quite as sincere and providing that. so the second demand, what they want with the concession that they had gotten from hitler in the
president woodrow wilson on the left. in 1933 we have a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and herbert hoover. the two of them didn't get along so well. there wasn't a lot of conversation during the right to the capitol. in many pictures the were taken that day, roosevelt can be seen leading to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning toward hoover and trying to have a conversation. every picture you will see hoover is just looking ahead ignoring him. there's been other times also where the president, the newly and the old, didn't get along so well and that mentioned in my book can't we all get along. sometimes the weather is a big issue. here's 1909 that is william howard taft driving together with teddy roosevelt. we can't see them, but they are in the carriage. and here is the route they take. that's pennsylvania avenue heading toward the capitol. now from 1829 all the way through 1977, which covers the great majority of american inaugurations they took place on the east side of the capitol, the east side. if you've been to washington, then you know that is the site where the li
with franklin d. roosevelt and herbert hoover. the two of them didn't get along so well. there wasn't a lot of conversations during their right to the capitol in of the pictures the were taken that day roosevelt can be seen leading to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning towards hoover and trying to have a conversation. every picture you will ever see he is looking straight ahead ignoring him. there's another times also for the presidents didn't get along so well and those were mentioned in my book and that chapter is called can't we all get along. sometimes where there is a big issue here is the 1909 that's william howard taft dredging together with teddy roosevelt. we can't see them there in the carriage and here's the route they take. that's pennsylvania avenue heading towards the capitol. from 1829 all the way through 1977, which covers the great majority of the american inaugurations they took place on the east side of the capitol that if you've been to washington than you know that's where the library of congress is and the united states supreme court, so here's what that look
". and will be talking with her co-author as well about this book. >> we don't know whether franklin roosevelt never heard about florence greenberg, unprecedented call for health care is right. even though he had endorsed the conference, he chose that time to go on vacation. fdr was actually on a cruise. i guess you can't blame him. three years earlier, after you refuse to include medical coverage as part of the social security act because he did not want to antagonize the american medical association. he did send a message of support, but not long after the outbreak of world war ii first president's attention elsewhere. five years later in january 11, in a in a state of the union address, roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war and especially the piece the allies plan to establish after fascism. he said the one supreme object is for the future can be summed up in one word, security. that means not only physical security which provides safety from attacks by aggressors, and it's also economic security and social security. the individual political right upon which the united states had b
family, good southern roosevelt democrats were mocking him every step of the way. >> right. >> he created the world. he creaated the world that we live in, at least the framework of it internationally. >> it's remarkable how many presidents we now look back on as iconic, examples for good who left barely a step ahead of the sheriff. >> just broken. >> washington was -- washington barely ran for a second term because he was so tired of being criticized. adams was defeated. jefferson left under a huge cloud. truman is the modern example of every president who gets in trouble wants to be truman because it means history implicates you, right? one of the things that happened was watergate. and it took 30 years, maybe a little bit less, but truman -- remember that one-man show -- >> the merle miller one? >> the plain speaking -- but there was a one-man show that went on just as watergate was breaking. and truman had the great good fortune of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all
to of franklin d. roosevelt, acting secretary-general of united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently named president of the carnegie endowment for national peace. he emphatically denied chambers's allegation. a great deal more than the reputations of these two men was at stake. if this was innocent, anti communism, and those closely associated with the like richard nixon. it was dealt a devastating blow. if alger hiss was guilty, anti communism would occupy a prominent part of the political landscape, and his spokesman would become national leaders. furthermore, chambers and alger hiss each represented one side in the epic struggle of the cold war. one man symbolized the philosophy of freedom and western civilization. the other the ideology of totalitarianism and marxism and leninism. both left and right understood that america and the world was at a critical point in history. considered a major political events had transpired between august of 1948 when chambers confronted alger hiss at a congressional hearing. in may of 1952 when chambers published his managerial and m
with commissioner kingsley. >> thank you. thank you to captain ferrigno and roosevelt middle school for hosting and thank you to those who are residents who came out this evening to be with us and to let us know what is on your mind. because that is what it's all about. so thank you. i have been on the police commission for a little over two years now. previously served on the ethics commission in san francisco. my day job is that of a business contracts mediator. i also on the board of law center to prevent gun violence. i have lived in san francisco most of my life and have raised my son here. thank you very much. >> and i am commissioner mazzucco. i'm a native san franciscan and my mother-in-law lives in the richmond district. i have raised my children in this city. my day job i an attorney, but for 19 years i was an assistant district attorney and also an assistant united states attorney. so i was in law enforcement for 19 years before going into private practice. and i played football at sacred heart high school with your lieutenant over in the corner. >> dr. joe marshall, and i am the
've learned in our work that the universal declaration of human rights that eleanor roosevelt shepherded and adopted bit general assembly 64 years ago is actually not known by a large proportion of our population. and we also found that when youth and adults found out about it, they got very excited and, in fact we got the name because someone said my goodness this document spells out the world it's could be. it has been the creative spirit of the administrators and students at balboa that have really brought this to life. we're now, i just got to see on friday, their third student-produced assembly about the universal declaration of human rights and it's breathtaking to see how their whole culture has taken on this path and that they are setting an example for how to help us bring forward eleanor roosevelt's work and make it continually relevant to the world today. i would love to have you here from kevin curr, the principal of balboa and oxy trejos, sr. to explain what it is to them. thank you so much. >> good evening commissioners. superintendent. you know, we live in kind of a high-
in the cafeteria. abc2's roosevelt leftwich has more. >> it was a townhall and the children's questions basically centered on trying to make things better in their schools. about 60 students from the eastern half of baltimore county had a frank talk with the superintendent. it was televised on the county school's network. one of the big esh use, school -- issues, school safety. they have heightened awareness about violence and bullying. it's about students being aware of their own surroundings and being involved in their own education and own safety. >> i think we have a good plan for being reactive. i want to change it to proactive. when you're proactive, kids feel like they're connected to the schools. you always har me talk about -- hear me talk about do the kids think someone knows them, understands them. we have some schools that do it extremely well, some schools starting to build those systems now. >> help wants input from all sources and he says he can be reached by facebook and twitter and promises to answer questions in about seven days. roosevelt leftwich, abc2 news. >> thanks a lot. g
front. franklin roosevelt is telling marshall we have to fight somewhere, it is an election year. and churchill pushed back in 1942 and 1943 and finally the norm normandy invasion came and he took a lot of heat from roosevelt, stalin, so i would like sir winston to have the opportunity to tell me in his own words the story behind the story. in his memoirs he avoids the squabbles, doesn't even mention it. but the alliance was perched on the cliff several times. host: what would he have been like to be around? guest: if you worked for him you would get a mercurial, sometimes generous, sometimes overbearing, sometimes almost cruel boss who, he didn't know how to apologize, which men of his age and class, they are not going to apologize to a young private secretary or typist. and he had a way of sort of turning the tables and his version of a apology would be to say i'm a very kind man and you are doing a very good job today but the issue was never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall a german bomb fell. he should not have been out at all
and detroit. franklin roosevelt had oklahoma on his finger tips in the oval office. and then you started to realize who is still alive to tell this story? you needed to find the critical mass of people. we did that to find a group of people who were children and teenagers at the time who would suffer through this ten-year apocalypse. amazingly enough i think all of us after two storms we leave and get our children out of there. some stayed and figured out where that stubborn american streak of perseverance and grit and said we're going to make this happen and they learned new techniques and the government helped them out and low and behold the weather got a little less severe and they emerged from it. it is one of the most fascinating periods. >> the man made piece is fascinating, too because that era is decade of a bubble. >> the more things change the more they stay the same. there is nothing new under the sun. we use these in every film we make. it is a real estate bubble, agriculture bubble. my house will always improve in value, the crop prices will be supported and the investments
's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually rarely put pen to paper himself. so what is the significance of this typewriter you have in the exhi business. >> are you absolutely write. churchill favorite method of working was by dictation. and this is what was then a state of the art silence typewriter, so that his secretaries could take down this torrent of words without disturbing his flow. >> and that there looks like the nobel prize. >> absolutely. this is churchill's nobel prize for literature. awarded for the totality of his written and spoken words. so we couldn't hope for a better center piece for an exhi business which is about the power of words. >> i think o
the better. franklin roosevelt, general marshall. we have to fight somewhere. it is an election year. churchill pushed back in 1942 and 1943. the normandy invasion came in 1944. for that, he put it forward for roosevelt and stalin most definitively. i would like to hear him tell me in his own words. in his memoirs, 10 years later writing these, he avoids writing about the squabbles'. he does not even mention them. but the lion is pushed from the cliffs several times. >> what would he be like to be around? >> if you worked for him, he would get a mercurial, sometimes generous, sometimes overbearing, sometimes almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. which men of his age and class -- they are not going to apologize to a young private secretary typist. they had a way of turning the tables. his version of an apology would be to say "you are doing a very good job today." the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word on an. one night, going through -- he should not have been out at all. his bodyguard pushed campbell -- pushed him into a doorway. a couple of men
an evening of happiness in a world of storm. >> sean: churchill would stay with president roosevelt for three weeks addressing a joint session of congress and going to church with the president. the remarkable period just a small part of a best sell ising book the last lion. it is the third volume of the churchill biography started by william manchester and completed by paul reid who joins me now. a remarkable man, churchill. one of the remarkable figures in history. before we get to this moment, how long was he an outcast and viewed as an extremist in great britain? >> pretty much h his whole political life. >> sean: before and after his time as prime minister? >> absolutely. early in the century he had switched from the conservative party to the liberal party and as he said later i ratted which is their way i saying they switched parties and then reratted and came back to the torries who never trusted him through the '20s and '30s. >> sean: he warned of the days of naziism in its time. he was trying to get the united states to take a moral stand and we got an isolationist movement in the co
they could become airborne. after the attack, president franklin roosevelt stated this day, december 7, as a day which will live in infamy. and it has. we gather to remember that attack on pearl harbor and honor those who received the blow of that first strike. and also remember and honor all those who served in world war ii. it is my pleasure today to represent the friends of the national world war ii memorial. an organization dedicated to ensuring that we always remember the greatest generation and their service, valor, and sacrifice. all those who supported on the home front. to achieve this, we worked very closely and proudly with the national parks service and with the department of defense to bring a events like this throughout the year and concerts' throughout the summer. this memorial is a very sacred place. where we come to visit, to remember, to reflect, and commemorate the defining moments of world war ii. and to honor those who served both on the battlefront and on the home front. and the families left behind. this memorial honors the more than 16 million men and women who
airborne. after the attack, president franklin delano roosevelt stated that this day, december the seventh is a day that will live in infamy, and it has. we gathered to remember that attack on pearl arbor -- pearl harbor and remember and honor all of those who served in world war two. it is my pleasure today to represent the friends of the national world war ii memorial. it is an organization that is dedicated to ensuring that we always remember the greatest generation and their service, valor, and sacrifice. all those who supported on the home front -- we worked closely and proudly with the national parks service and the department of defense to bring event like this throughout the year and throughout the summer. this memorial is a very sacred cut -- a sacred place where we come to visit, to remember, to reflect, and to commemorate the defining moments of world war two -- world war ii , and to honor those who served on the battlefront and the home front and the families that were left behind. this memorial honors the more than 16 million men and women who served in our armed forces during
. for example, since the great depression where our president was franklin roosevelt, every subsequent president has had the unfortunate need to cope with an economic downturn. that's what it means to be the president of an unstable system. and every president has made the same promise, starting with roosevelt and including mr. obama. if you will just follow my policies, these presidents have all said, not only will you get out of the current economic mess , but we will thereby make sure that this kind of economic crash does not affect our children. every president has promised it, no president has yet delivered on a promise. everyone has failed. we cannot control the. from monetary policy to fiscal policy, the federal reserve, stimulus program. we were not supposed to have this crisis. when it began to be clear that we are heading into a real doozy we were told by mr. bush and his advisers that it was just in the housing market and the sub prime mortgage and it would all work out. nothing to worry about. the federal reserve has just decided on the quantitative easing program number three. the o
the documents we have seen, the archives that describe the relationship between roosevelt and stalin and truman, we note the minivans from our point of view. what i wanted to do was show from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people who were subjected to this system, and how do people make choices in that system, and how do they react and behavior? i started systematically. i went through archives in warsaw and berlin and budapest. i looked at government archives. i looked at secret police archives, all of which are now open, some of them easier to use than others. some give a better and worse account. in this part of the world the archives are open, and you can reach them. i looked at institutions, so i looked at the hon. film industry. how did the hon gary and film industry -- i look at been h -- the hungarian film industry. how did it become a social realist film industry? it had a different background. i look at german painters. germany had a vibrant abstract art movement in the 1930's and the 1920's. they came back to berlin, thinking they would be able to paint what th
jesus, did we not? >> yes. >> was that in the company, the era of teddy roosevelt and his lament over the overcivilized men in the famous speech he gave? >> right in the strenuous life. in that period, 19th century turning into the 20th century as roosevelt's roughriders were going up san juan hill and pursuing the spanish american war there's an effort to buff jesus up essentially, emphasize his scenes where he kicks the money changers out of the temple or where he's a carpenter and he's buff and got strong muscles and that sort of thing and that was an effort to bring men back in the churches, there were very few at that time and there was an effort to attract them. >> we won't try to summarize the various permutations of the image of jesus in your book, but one of the funer aspects of it is your portrayal or your backgrounding of the laughing jesus. correct? >> yes. >> what was that? >> well,, you know, i think this is where the friendly mr. rogers jesus sort of ends up is the jesus who laughs. >> who produced the laughing jesus? >> well, there was a couple efforts to do it. there
idea was franklin roosevelt in 1940, he recommended that these vessels be built to deal with the continuing presence of the nazi u-boats in world war ii on the north atlantic. and winston churchill warned roosevelt and america that, basically, something had to be done to stop hitler's u-boats in the war before, as he said it, america -- the sea would become america's cage, cutting off all commerce between the united states, england and europe. and so the president ordered them built in 1940, but the navy, um, decided that that was probably not a good idea. so they convinced the president that the scarce resources that were available at that time would be better spent on destroyers. and i think that if you look at the historical record, you'll see that that probably was a mistake. the destroyer escort is sort of a novel type of vessel. it's smaller than a destroyer, um, around 300 feet. and it had a shorter turning radius so that it could, it could essentially turn on a dime compared to a destroyer. so what they did is they escorted the convoys across the atlantic, and th
envoy from f.d.r. and his walking orders from roosevelt were to find out everything that we can do for england short of going to war and get it to them. and randolph was, i think, in the egyptian desert on duty. was a brave soldier. and pamela and randolph and harriman met. they would have to at these weekend dinners that churchill had at checkers, the official home of the prime minister, because by then chartwell is in moth balls for the duration. host: where is chartwell? guest: in kent, 40 to 45 miles southeast of london, lovely green vistas and villages. and checker is also of that distance from london but not on the flight path of the german bombers. host: in 2010 winston churchill iii died of prostate cancer but in 1999 was here and we want to show you. [video clip] >> finally he was given that monumental kick in the teeth by the british electorate in the hour of victory, the architect of victory. and he took it quite hard. my grandmother said perhaps it is a blessing in disguise to which she said if so very effectively disguised. host: what was his grandmother like, clement
, this became a major theme. what works, what momentum work. marshall and roosevelt, to me, are the model of good civil/military relations, goodies course. they're not particularly friendly. >> right. you say marshall refused to even have dinner with roosevelt. >> yeah. didn't like having dinner with him, refused to laugh at his jokes. when fdr refers to him as george, he makes it clear that his name is general marshall. [laughter] and the first time marshall ever went to hyde park, roosevelt's home, was for his funeral, to be a pal bearer. he kept his distance. yet was selected for the job because he was candid with roosevelt. before he was army chief of staff as a brigadier, nice the oval -- he's in the oval office, and basically, roosevelt kind of blows him off, and he says, wait a minute, you need to hear me out here. he says, no, mr. president, you're wrong, and let me tell you why. roosevelt likes that. that's good civil/military discourse. it's not being chummy, it is exploring your assumptionings and surfacing your differences and examining them. a big mistake going into iraq was
it was declared finished in '97 by teddy roosevelt. and stanford white came here somewhere around 1872, and he said of all the terrible things i've got to spend another night in albany. he said, of all the one-horse towns, this is the absolute worst, and it was -- [inaudible] and the devil. [laughter] and i have to spend another night in albany. but, you know, that changed when the capitol went up. then suddenly albany became a tourist attraction. "o albany," which is kind of an impressionistic history of the city, was an ambitious project, 26 articles that covered the whole nick history of thety and -- city and every geographic neighborhood and a lot more. and it sold extremely well all over the country. it was an unusual development, and it's been selling ever since. it's a phenomenon that i don't quite understand, but -- and what i discovered was what a fantastic town this is. and i, you know, i had left albany and really never wanted to come back. you know, i'd come back for the family, but when the circumstances brought me back and then i got thrust into this situation, and so i started t
to elise lavitt. as we wait here and watch what will be taking place in the roosevelt room, i understand, maybe a couple of minutes later than expected. we know he will be going before the senate and it's pretty clear that he stands a pretty good chance of being confirmed. does he have any detractor, do you think? >> there probablel be a few, people who remember all those negative swift boat advertising that came in the 2004 campaign. you might get a few, but i think he'll be overwhelmingly confirmed and that was set -- the tone was set the other day when senator john mccain was friendly with senator kerrie and started calling him mr. secretary and everybody was laughing and having a good time. senator mccain had made it very clear he was not going to -- he was not very happy with susan rice potentially becoming the secretary of state and u.s. ambassador to the united nations and that would have been a tumultuous confirmation process, but i think they'll basically let him go through and there will be tough questions and issues will be raised, but i have no doubt that he'll be confirmed o
of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churned out a liberty ship in a record four and a half days. that's faster than most of my students can write one of their semester papers. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technology to thoroughly pummeled the enemy before a single american soldier was sent into battle. the war also exposed the fact that japan, which adopted some of the capitalistic production methods in america, lacked the essential powers of exceptionalism to employ them fully in wartime. without free speech, free markets, constitutional protection that about great inventors and businessmen to try new ideas and fail without punishment, japan fell behind the u.s. almost instantly. in four years of war, the u.s. produced 17 fleet carri
rid of -- before d-day? franklin roosevelt was having affairs. franklin roosevelt had two very long-term affairs. one with missy lehand ,-com,-com ma his personal aide and secretary and cook and dresser-rand undress her apparently too. what if we found out about fdr's misbehavior and what if we threw fdr out of office as the economy was recovering? all the way back to the french and indian war, very young george washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated woman. what if washington letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? but just petraeus' e-mails became public and what if we got rid of george washington? bill clinton is not the first and not the worst in petraeus is not the first for the worse. in there ,-com,-com ma done that and there's a long history in infected pains me to say that even abraham lincoln visited a prostitute. i know, say it isn't so, right? but it happened. the details are sketchy and there's not a lot of letter
? with better elections in the future. >> it's a great question. theodore roosevelt in the 1880s decides he wants to get into politics. theodore roosevelt became permit very aristocratic family. went to harvard, was independently wealthy. all of the social friends that she had and what are doing? roosevelts and ongoing to determine an irish forest. they said how can you do that? and incumbent gary sherman said irishman. [laughter] and roosevelt said, political power in this city is decided in the saloons and you can set appear in your penthouse all you want, but i want to be in the room with the decisions made. what to take your demographically. and this is very so deeply disagree with their consulting class and candidly with one of the comments of our last nominee. i don't see demographic problems what do you think asian americans while? they want a good education. their passionate. they love their children. their best to limit children. they invest more heavily in their children than any other group. just had a survey i saw this morning came out. guess what the number one validation of ac
in the roosevelt room expected to nominate senator john kerry for secretary of state and we'll bring that to you life. i'm glad we got cdw and cisco to design our data center. yeah, the cisco ucsc series server, with the intel xeon processors, help us scale smoothly, like a perfect golf swing. how was it before? clunky and full of unnecessary impediments. like charles' swing. i heard that. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. sgreerchlgs as we await the announcement of john kerry's normal nation by the president at the white house, a nomination resulting in part from susan rice's withdrawal from contention after that uproar over her comments on benghazi. joining us now one of the leading critics of the administration's response to benghazi, republican congressman jason chaffitz. i know the senate is the confirming body, not you, but does this end the controversy over benghazi, or does that continue and need to be investigated? that, th
to report. reporting live in the inner harbor, roosevelt leftwich, abc2 news. >> thanks. the new year's spectacular will attract traffic downtown. we have all the details. >> reporter: you'll want to expect heavy congestion. the spectacular will shut down many roads. they include pratt street at charles street, baltimore at gay street and lombard will be shut down at president's street. traffic on 394 north will be detoured on to howard street and you won't have access to conway. southbound travel will be diverted on to lombard street. everything will reopen right after the fireworks and parking restrictions are in effect for a large portion of the inner harbor through 3 a.m. for a complete list of all of the road closures, go to abc2news.com. i'm lauren cook and that's your time saver report. >> it's been 12 months filled with stories of joy, sadness, grieve, elation and astonishment. we said hello to some new face and good-bye to other ones. let's look back at the top stories of 2012. >> a massive crowd has gathered here. >> we want to be free people. >> the italian crows ship capsi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 314 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)